Most of the work done is the lab is the product of collaborations


Current lab members


Lorenzo Lorenzo-Luaces, PhD
Assistant Professor
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail
:

Internalizing symptoms like depression and anxiety are leading causes of disability worldwide. Overall, cognitive-behavioral therapies are effective interventions for depression and anxiety. However, not all who complete a course of CBT treatment experience a remission of their symptoms, we do not know who will experience positive outcomes following CBTs, and we have a somewhat limited understanding of how CBTs achieve their effects. I am an expert in CBT for depression having studied outcomes and processes of change in treatment. A major line of my work involves exploring the heterogeneity of depression and other clinical problems to uncover individual differences in treatments outcomes and processes, especially those differences that emerge from data-driven approaches. Although I believe that studying individual differences can get us closer to data-driven personalization of treatment for depression and anxiety, I am also aware that many individuals get better without needing “personalization” and that CBTs are very hard to access. So, a line of my work involves studying low-intensity ways of delivering CBTs including by using internet-based CBTs (iCBT) and CBT content delivered via books (“bibliotherapy”). We know from great work by others that low-intensity CBT can be as effective as CBT delivered more “traditionally” like face-to-face in weekly sessions but our work involves studying the acceptability and dissemination of these interventions to clinicians and patients. More recently, I have also become interested in studying vulnerability to depression and anxiety as can be indexed with data and meta-data that we can acquire from individuals passively (e.g., by mining their social media accounts).


Lauren A. Rutter, PhD
Research Scientist
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

I am broadly interested in the classification of mood and anxiety disorders (internalizing psychopathology). This includes the structure, comorbidity, and shared mechanisms of vulnerability in both clinical and population-based samples. More specifically, in studying mood and anxiety, I am interested in how people process emotional faces and how differences in processing may put them more at risk. My research also examines how changes in neurocognition across the lifespan are linked to risk for developing symptoms. My newest line of research uses social media to study internalizing psychopathology.

Jacqueline Howard, BA
SADCAT Lab Manager
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

My primary research interests focus on dissemination and implementation, specifically the implementation of measurement-based care in community settings, as well as the impact of trauma on functioning and emotion regulation. Currently I am working on a project assessing whether anxiety is a superior predictor of decreased functioning and well-being in individuals with symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD).


Robinson De Jesus-Romero, M.S.
Graduate Student (3rd year)
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

Before coming to Indiana University, I graduated from the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. I then completed a Master of Science in Research in Behavior and Cognition at the University of Barcelona. My current interests revolve around internet-based therapies, emotion regulation, and individualized treatment for depression. Specifically, I am interested in improving the efficacy and access to internet-based therapies, as well as studying emotion regulation as a way to personalize treatment. A special focus of my work is improving health for individuals from minoritized backgrounds, including racial-ethinic minorities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans/gender non-conforming (LGQT+) individuals.

Allison “Alli” Peipert, BS
Graduate Student (3rd year)
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

I am in three broad areas of study: measurement and classification of psychopathology, moderating and mediating factors of treatment efficacy, and translation of research findings into clinical practice. I hope to inform standardized assessment practices, improve our understanding of evidence-based treatment, and identify strategies to integrate research findings into standard care. My current research projects include analyzing patient outcomes from IU’s CBT Training Clinic and implementing an evidence-based screening and assessment practice for mental health using the CAT-MH in local behavioral medicine clinics.


John “Jack” Buss, BS
Graduate Student (1st year)
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

I am a clinical science graduate student primarily interested in the classification and computational modeling of mood disorders. My current projects include evaluations of the heterogeneity within the melancholic and atypical specifiers for depression and an assessment of melancholic symptoms as represented by the Sydney Melancholia Prototype Index (SMPI). I hope to help further the research field’s understanding regarding these traditional depressive subtypes considering depression’s potential endophenotypes.

Isabella Starvaggi, BA
Graduate Student (1st year)
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

Before coming to Indiana University, I completed a B.S. in Psychology and a B.S. in Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. During my undergraduate years I also conducted research at the University of Pittsburgh investigating cognitive vulnerabilities in seasonal affective depression. I am currently interested in digitally delivered treatments for depression, prediction of individual treatment “match” and treatment response, depression assessment and diagnosis.


Colton Lind
Research Assistant
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

My research interests include internet-based treatments for psychological problems, and the effects of trauma on daily life. Currently, I am working on a project involving mental health apps such as Calm, and Headspace.

Past lab members


Tennisha N. Riley
Assistant Professor
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

Tennisha N. Riley joined the SADCAT lab in 2018 as a postdoctoral fellow at the Indiana University Center for Research on Race and Ethnicity in Society (CRRES) after receiving her PhD in Developmental Psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University. Tennisha is an adolescent researcher who examines emotion expression and emotion regulation within social context broadly. Her primary research focus is on understanding the emotional development of Black youth, examining how Black youth’s social context (family, friends, school) influence emotion expression and emotion regulation, as well as the role emotion expression and emotion regulation play in Black youth’s decisions to engage in both risk-related and prosocial behaviors. Tennisha is now an Assistant Professor in IU’s School of Education’s Counseling and Educational Psychology Department.


Kass Botts, BA
Research Assistant
Indiana University-Bloomington
E-mail:

I am a post-baccalaureate student seeking a second degree in Psychology (B.S) with an interest in clinical work. My background is in harm reduction services for people who inject drugs, participate in other risky activities, or who experience extreme poverty. I am interested in the comorbidity of affective disorders and substance use disorders, and the efficacy of brief interventions and self help therapeutic resources in reducing the public health burden of substance use disorders and concomitant affective disorders.


Kendall Riley, B.S.
Graduate Student
University of Iowa

I graduated from Indiana University in 2020 with B.S. degrees in human biology and psychology. My research interests lie at the intersection of public health, sociology, and criminology. During my undergraduate education, I worked in clinical psychology and social psychology laboratories wherein I was the lead research assistant on projects centered around substance use, stigma, and youth disinhibition. These experiences jumpstarted my interest on adversity, health, and the collateral consequences of incarceration. In graduate school, my main line of research explores incarceration as a social determinant of health. I aim to highlight what fosters resiliency in the face of incarceration, especially for Black families. Outside of research, I enjoy reading, weightlifting, playing with my cats, and online window shopping.


Emily Johns, BA
Graduate Student
University of Missouri


Other lab members:

  • Greg Banks
  • Devon Miller
  • Tres Lamar Kirtley